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Psychiatry Res. 2016 Sep 30;243:43-8. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.02.022. Epub 2016 Feb 16.

Elevated levels of Hs-CRP and IL-6 after delivery are associated with depression during the 6 months post partum.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8, Gongti South Road, Beijing 100020, PR China.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8, Gongti South Road, Beijing 100020, PR China. Electronic address: zhangzycy@163.com.

Abstract

The objective of this study is to determine whether inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6) early in the postpartum period contribute to the development of postpartum depression (PPD). From 4 May 2014 to 30 June 2014, all eligible women not on medication for depression giving birth at the Beijing Chao-Yang hospital were consecutively recruited and followed up for 6 months. Depression symptoms were measured with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and inflammatory biomarkers (Hs-CRP and IL-6) were tested. During the study period, 296 women were enrolled and completed follow-up. In these women, 45 (15.2%) were considered as meeting the criteria for PPD. Serum levels of Hs-CRP and IL-6 in women with PPD were significantly higher than those without PPD (all P<0.0001). Receiver operating characteristics to predict PPD demonstrated areas under the curve of IL-6 of 0.861 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.801-0.922), which was superior to Hs-CRP (0.837 (95% CI, 0.781-0.894), P<0.01). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, IL-6 and Hs-CRP were independent predictors of PPD. The present study demonstrates a strong relationship between elevated serum Hs-CRP and IL-6 levels at admission and the development of PPD within 6 months.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese; Depression; Hs-CRP; IL-6; Postpartum

PMID:
27359302
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2016.02.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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