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Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;104(2):406-14. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.131672. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

Prediagnostic selenium status and hepatobiliary cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology and Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; davidhughes@rcsi.ie.
  • 2Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France; Institut Universitari d'Investigació en Atenció Primària Jordi Gol (IDIAP Jordi Gol), Barcelona, Spain;
  • 3Institut für Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany;
  • 4Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece;
  • 5Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France;
  • 6Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany;
  • 7Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark;
  • 8Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark;
  • 9Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), CESP Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Villejuif, France; Université Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France; Institute Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France;
  • 10Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany;
  • 11Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA;
  • 12Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece;
  • 13Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy;
  • 14Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy;
  • 15Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia Federico II, Naples, Italy;
  • 16Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic-M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy;
  • 17Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital-University of Turin and Center for Cancer Prevention, Turin, Italy;
  • 18Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom;
  • 19Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health.
  • 20The Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (VKM), Oslo, Norway;
  • 21Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland;
  • 22Oviedo University, Oviedo, Spain;
  • 23Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain;
  • 24Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs Granada, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain; Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain;
  • 25CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain;
  • 26CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain; Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain;
  • 27Public Health Direction and Biodonostia-Ciberesp, Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain;
  • 28Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden;
  • 29MRC Epidemiology Unit and.
  • 30Clinical Gerontology, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; and.
  • 31Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
  • 32Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom;

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Selenium status is suboptimal in many Europeans and may be a risk factor for the development of various cancers, including those of the liver and biliary tract.

OBJECTIVE:

We wished to examine whether selenium status in advance of cancer onset is associated with hepatobiliary cancers in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study.

DESIGN:

We assessed prediagnostic selenium status by measuring serum concentrations of selenium and selenoprotein P (SePP; the major circulating selenium transfer protein) and examined the association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; n = 121), gallbladder and biliary tract cancers (GBTCs; n = 100), and intrahepatic bile duct cancer (IHBC; n = 40) risk in a nested case-control design within the EPIC study. Selenium was measured by total reflection X-ray fluorescence, and SePP was determined by a colorimetric sandwich ELISA. Multivariable ORs and 95% CIs were calculated by using conditional logistic regression.

RESULTS:

HCC and GBTC cases, but not IHBC cases, showed significantly lower circulating selenium and SePP concentrations than their matched controls. Higher circulating selenium was associated with a significantly lower HCC risk (OR per 20-μg/L increase: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.23, 0.72) but not with the risk of GBTC or IHBC. Similarly, higher SePP concentrations were associated with lowered HCC risk only in both the categorical and continuous analyses (HCC: P-trend ≤ 0.0001; OR per 1.5-mg/L increase: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.63).

CONCLUSION:

These findings from a large prospective cohort provide evidence that suboptimal selenium status in Europeans may be associated with an appreciably increased risk of HCC development.

KEYWORDS:

hepatobiliary cancer; hepatocellular carcinoma; liver cancer; prospective cohort; selenium; selenium status; selenoprotein P

PMID:
27357089
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.116.131672
[PubMed - in process]
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