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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Sep;101(9):3272-80. doi: 10.1210/jc.2016-1045. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

The Association Between Sleep Duration, Insulin Sensitivity, and β-Cell Function: The EGIR-RISC Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (F.R., J.M.D.), Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO+ Institute for Care Research (F.R., J.M.D.), Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; PHARMO Institute for Drug Outcome Research (H.B.), Utrecht, The Netherlands; Institute of Cellular Medicine (M.W.), Medical School Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom; Institute of Neuroscience (A.M.), National Research Council, Padova, Italy; Institute for Metabolic Research (T.K.), Frankfurt, Germany; Department of Clinical Sciences (P.M.N.), Lund University and University Hospital Malmo, Lund, Sweden; and Inserm U1081CESP (B.B.), Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Renal and Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Villejuif, France.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

In the past decade, over 3 dozen studies reported a relationship between self-reported short sleep and disturbed glucose metabolism. A study with insulin sensitivity assessed according to the gold standard hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp is, however, still missing.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the cross-sectional association of sleep duration with insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in the European group for the study of insulin resistance (EGIR-RISC) study cohort.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND MEASURES:

We used data from the baseline measurements of the European, multicentre EGIR-RISC study that included 1319 clinically healthy participants. Sleep and physical activity were measured using a single-axis accelerometer. Insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were estimated by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and from the oral glucose insulin sensitivity index model, using an oral glucose tolerance test. Associations of sleep duration with insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were analyzed by multiple linear regression, stratified by sex.

RESULTS:

In our current analysis, we included 788 participants (57% women, age 44 ± 8 y), who had an average sleep duration of 7.3 ± 1.5 hours. In men, we observed an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration categorized per hour and M/I (in μmol/min per kgFFM/nM per hour) (β-estimate [95% confidence intervals] 41 [2, 80]; P = .04 and β(2)-estimate -3 [-6, -0.2], P = .04) as well as a trend for the oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (in mL/min per kgFFM) (β-estimate [95% confidence intervals] 0.8 [-0.4, 2]; P = .17). In women, we observed a U-shaped association between sleep duration and β-cell function (in pmol/min per m(2)/mM per hour) (β-estimate -45 [-86, -3]; P = .04 and β(2)-estimate 3 [0.2, 6]; P = .04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep duration is associated with insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in a sex-specific manner in clinically healthy people.

PMID:
27355399
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2016-1045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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