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Trop Med Int Health. 2016 Sep;21(9):1171-80. doi: 10.1111/tmi.12743. Epub 2016 Jul 26.

Rhinovirus species and clinical features in children hospitalised with pneumonia from Mozambique.

Author information

1
School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
2
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
3
Centro de Investigação em Saúde de Manhiça, Maputo, Mozambique.
4
ISGlobal, Barcelona Centre for International Health Research, Hospital Clínic - Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
5
School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
6
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the prevalence of human rhinovirus (RV) species in children hospitalised with pneumonia in Manhiça, Mozambique, and the associations between RV species and demographic, clinical and laboratory features.

METHODS:

Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children 0 to 10 years of age (n = 277) presenting to Manhiça District Hospital with clinical pneumonia. Blood samples were collected for HIV and malaria testing, blood culture and full blood counts, and a chest X-ray was performed. A panel of common respiratory viruses was investigated using two independent multiplex RT-PCR assays with primers specific for each virus and viral type. RV species and genotypes were identified by seminested PCR assays, sequencing and phylogenetic tree analyses.

RESULTS:

At least one respiratory virus was identified in 206 (74.4%) children hospitalised with clinical pneumonia. RV was the most common virus identified in both HIV-infected (17 of 38, 44.7%) and HIV-uninfected (74 of 237, 31.2%; P = 0.100) children. RV-A was the most common RV species identified (47 of 275, 17.0%), followed by RV-C (35/275, 12.6%) and RV-B (8/275, 2.9%). Clinical presentation of the different RV species was similar and overlapping, with no particular species being associated with specific clinical features.

CONCLUSIONS:

RV-A and RV-C were the most common respiratory viruses identified in children hospitalised with clinical pneumonia in Manhiça. Clinical presentation of RV-A and RV-C was similar and overlapping.

KEYWORDS:

Mozambique; children; enfants; neumonía; niños; pneumonia; pneumonie; rhinovirus

PMID:
27353724
DOI:
10.1111/tmi.12743
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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