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Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 2016 Sep;125:90-9. doi: 10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2016.06.003. Epub 2016 Jun 24.

Linoleic acid and the pathogenesis of obesity.

Author information

1
Centre for Chronic Disease, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, PO Box 14428, Melbourne, Victoria 8001, Australia.
2
Centre for Chronic Disease, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, PO Box 14428, Melbourne, Victoria 8001, Australia; Florey Neuroscience Institutes, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
4
Centre for Chronic Disease, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, PO Box 14428, Melbourne, Victoria 8001, Australia. Electronic address: andrew.mcainch@vu.edu.au.

Abstract

The modern Western diet has been consumed in developed English speaking countries for the last 50 years, and is now gradually being adopted in Eastern and developing countries. These nutrition transitions are typified by an increased intake of high linoleic acid (LA) plant oils, due to their abundance and low price, resulting in an increase in the PUFA n-6:n-3 ratio. This increase in LA above what is estimated to be required is hypothesised to be implicated in the increased rates of obesity and other associated non-communicable diseases which occur following a transition to a modern Westernised diet. LA can be converted to the metabolically active arachidonic acid, which has roles in inducing inflammation and adipogenesis, and endocannabinoid system regulation. This review aims to address the possible implications of excessive LA and its metabolites in the pathogenesis of obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Endocannabinoids; Inflammation; Linoleic acid; Nutrition transition; Obesity

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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