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Pediatr Obes. 2017 Aug;12 Suppl 1:18-25. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12163. Epub 2016 Jun 28.

Weight gain in pregnancy and child weight status from birth to adulthood in the United States.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
2
Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
3
Division of General Medical Disciplines, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
4
Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Nutrition Policy Institute, University of California, Oakland, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High weight gain in pregnancy has been associated with child adiposity, but few studies have assessed the relationship across childhood or in racially/ethnically diverse populations.

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of the study are to test if weight gain in pregnancy is associated with high birthweight and overweight/obesity in early, middle and late childhood and whether these associations differ by maternal race/ethnicity.

METHODS:

Mother-child dyads (n = 7539) were included from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a nationally representative cohort study in the USA (1979-2012). Log-binomial regression models were used to analyse associations between weight gain and the outcomes: high birthweight (>4000 g) and overweight/obesity at ages 2-5, 6-11 and 12-19 years.

RESULTS:

Excessive weight gain was positively associated, and inadequate weight gain was negatively associated with high birthweight after confounder adjustment (P < 0.05). Only excessive weight gain was associated with overweight in early, middle and late childhood. These associations were not significant in Hispanics or Blacks although racial/ethnic interaction was only significant ages 12-19 years (P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

Helping pregnant women gain weight within national recommendations may aid in preventing overweight and obesity across childhood, particularly for non-Hispanic White mothers.

KEYWORDS:

foetal macrosomia; obesity; paediatric obesity; weight gain

PMID:
27350375
PMCID:
PMC5404997
[Available on 2018-08-01]
DOI:
10.1111/ijpo.12163
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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