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J Am Coll Health. 2016 Oct;64(7):565-74. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2016.1205073. Epub 2016 Jun 27.

Depression, anxiety, and tobacco use: Overlapping impediments to sleep in a national sample of college students.

Author information

1
a Department of Psychology , University of St. Thomas , St. Paul , Minnesota , USA.
2
b Mayo Clinic , Rochester , Minnesota , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine how tobacco use and depression/anxiety disorders are related to disturbed sleep in college students.

PARTICIPANTS:

85,138 undergraduate respondents (66.3% female, 74.5% white, non-Hispanic, ages 18-25) from the Spring 2011 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II database.

METHODS:

Multivariate analyses of tobacco use (none, intermediate, daily) and mental health (diagnosed and/or symptomatic depression or anxiety) were used to predict sleep disturbance.

RESULTS:

Daily tobacco use was associated with more sleep problems than binge drinking, illegal drug use, obesity, gender, and working >20 hours/week. Students with depression or anxiety reported more sleep disturbances than individuals without either disorder, and tobacco use in this population was associated with the most sleep problems.

CONCLUSIONS:

Tobacco use and depression/anxiety disorders are both independently associated with more sleep problems in college students. Students with depression and/or anxiety are more likely to be daily tobacco users, which likely exacerbates their sleep problems.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; college students; depression; insomnia; sleep; tobacco

PMID:
27347758
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2016.1205073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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