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J Infect Chemother. 2016 Aug;22(8):553-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2016.05.008. Epub 2016 Jun 23.

Risk factors for mortality in patients with septic pulmonary embolism.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, South Korea.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, South Korea. Electronic address: sicha@knu.ac.kr.
3
Department of Radiology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, South Korea.

Abstract

Data regarding prognostic factors for patients with septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) are lacking. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of SPE and to ascertain the risk factors for mortality in patients with this condition. Patients with SPE, whose data were retrospectively collected from a tertiary referral center in Korea, were categorized by the presence or absence of in-hospital death into two groups: death and survival groups. The two groups were compared for clinical and radiologic parameters. SPE was community-acquired in most patients (78%). The most common focus of primary infection was that of bone, joint, or soft tissue (33%), followed by liver abscess (17%). The in-hospital mortality was 12%. Multivariate analysis showed that tachypnea (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-20.53, p = 0.038) and segmental or lobar consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scan (OR 10.79, 95% CI 2.51-46.43, p = 0.001) were independent predictors of in-hospital death in SPE patients. Taken together, the primary infectious foci of SPE in Korea are different from those reported in Western countries. Tachypnea and segmental or lobar consolidation on CT scan may be independent risk factors for in-hospital death in these patients.

KEYWORDS:

Comorbidity; Computed tomography; Infection; Metastatic; Mortality

PMID:
27346380
DOI:
10.1016/j.jiac.2016.05.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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