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Br J Nurs. 2016 Jun 23;25(12):S14-21. doi: 10.12968/bjon.2016.25.12.S14.

Evaluating a training programme at Viet Duc University Hospital in Vietnam.

Author information

1
Medical Education, Training and Guideline Center, President of the Vietname Surgical Nursing Branch Office, Vietnam.
2
Chief of Septic Surgery and Deputy Chief of Planninng Department, Viet Duc Hospital, Vietnam.
3
Director, Curriculum Development Center for Human Resources in Health, Hanoi Medical University, Vietnam.
4
Professor of Community Health Care Studies, Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences, Birmingham City University.

Abstract

Vietnam's nursing competency standards (VNCS) were issued in 2012 as the legal framework on which the continuous nursing training programme are designed and developed.

OBJECTIVES:

The study aimed to assess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as the confidence of nurses regarding wound care at Viet Duc University Hospital before and after a new educational intervention.

METHOD:

A comparative descriptive study was carried out in 2014 at Viet Duc University Hospital. The study reviewed knowledge, skills, attitude and confidence among nurses working in seven clinical departments. The data collection tools included a 48-knowledge-item self-administered questionnaire, a sixteen-item skills set, and attitude-item observation sheet and a thirteen confidence level-item observation sheet, adapted for the field of wound care. Data were loaded into Epidata version 3.1 and analysed with SPSS version 16.0.

RESULTS:

The mean pre-training knowledge, skill, attitude and confidence scores were (117.78±24.94), (53.61±10.26), (54.39±8.02) and (1.18-3.59), respectively, while the corresponding post-training scores were (148.68±16.54), (62.33±8.40), (60.80±8.75) and (1.50-4.15) p<0.0001.

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS:

This was the first cohort to undergo the new training programme and has shown promising initial results; however, it also demonstrates that the training content, while leading to positive changes, does in some areas need to be further developed and then disseminated across the hospital to all nurses who provide direct wound care for patients.

KEYWORDS:

Knowledge; Nurse education and training; Nursing competency; Practical wound care

PMID:
27345077
DOI:
10.12968/bjon.2016.25.12.S14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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