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J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Dec;87(12):1350-1353. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2016-313410. Epub 2016 Jun 24.

Dietary salt intake and time to relapse in paediatric multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
UCSF Regional Paediatric MS Center, San Francisco, California, USA.
2
Department of Paediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, UT Southwestern, Dallas, Texas, USA.
6
The Paediatric MS Center at the Jacobs Neurological Institute, SUNY Buffalo, New York, USA.
7
Department of Child Neurology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, USA.
8
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
9
Alabama Paediatric MS Center, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.
10
Department of Paediatric Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
11
Department of Neurology, New York University, New York, New York, USA.
12
Partners Paediatric MS Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
13
Department of Neurology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
14
Department of Epidemiology, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Salt intake was reported to be associated with increased clinical and MRI activity in adult patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS).

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if salt intake is associated with time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS.

METHODS:

Paediatric-onset MS and patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) within 4 years of disease onset were recruited from 15 paediatric MS centres in the USA as part of a case-control study. Patients with available prospective relapse data subsequent to enrolment were included in this project. Dietary sodium intake was assessed by self-report questionnaire using the validated Block Kids Food Screener. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to determine the association of sodium density, excess sodium intake and sodium density tertiles with time to relapse following study enrolment, adjusting for several confounders.

RESULTS:

174 relapsing-remitting MS/CIS patients were included in this analysis (mean age of 15.0 years, and 64.9% females). Median duration of follow-up was 1.8 years. In an unadjusted analysis, density of daily sodium intake was not associated with time to relapse, and patients with excess sodium intake had no decrease in time to relapse as compared with patients with non-excess sodium intake. The multivariable analysis demonstrated that patients in the medium and high tertile of sodium density had a HR of 0.69 (95% CI 0.37 to 1.30, p=0.25) and 1.37 (95% CI 0.74 to 2.51, p=0.32) compared with patients in the lowest tertile, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher salt intake was not associated with decreased time to relapse in patients with paediatric-onset MS.

Comment in

PMID:
27343226
PMCID:
PMC5370574
DOI:
10.1136/jnnp-2016-313410
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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