Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2016 Sep;9(9):758-65. doi: 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-15-0434. Epub 2016 Jun 23.

Circulating Osteopontin and Prediction of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development in a Large European Population.

Author information

1
Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. Institut Universitari d'Investigació en Atenció Primària Jordi Gol (IDIAP Jordi Gol), Barcelona, Spain.
2
Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
3
Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
4
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Section of Genetics, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
6
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
7
Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Australia.
9
Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino, Italy.
10
Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Lifestyle, Genes and Health: Integrative Trans-generational Epidemiology, Villejuif, France. Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
11
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
12
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.
13
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Greece.
14
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy.
15
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy.
16
Dipartimento Di Medicina, Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
17
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy.
18
Human Genetics Foundation, Torino Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Torino, Italy.
19
Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
20
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands. MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.
21
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Cancer Registry of Norway, NO-0304 Oslo, Norway. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Instituet, SE-171 Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Genetic Epidemiology, Folkhälsan Research Center, 00250 Helsinki, Finland.
22
Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
23
Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL.L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
24
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Spain.
25
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Spain. Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA) Pamplona, Spain.
26
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Spain. Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
27
Public Health Direction and CIBERESP-Biodonostia Research Institute, Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain.
28
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
29
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden.
30
Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
31
Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
32
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
33
Clinical Gerontology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
34
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
35
Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
36
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
37
Institute for Advanced Biosciences (IAB), Inserm U1209, CNRS UMR5309, Université Grenoble-Alpes, Site Santé Grenoble, Allée des Alpes, La Tronche, France.
38
Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. lberetta@mdanderson.org.

Abstract

We previously identified osteopontin (OPN) as a promising marker for the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we investigated the association between prediagnostic circulating OPN levels and HCC incidence in a large population-based cohort. A nested case-control study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. During a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 100 HCC cases were identified. Each case was matched to two controls and OPN levels were measured in baseline plasma samples. Viral hepatitis, liver function, and α-fetoprotein (AFP) tests were also conducted. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate multivariable odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for OPN levels in relation to HCC. Receiver operating characteristics curves were constructed to determine the discriminatory accuracy of OPN alone or in combination with other liver biomarkers in the prediction of HCC. OPN levels were positively associated with HCC risk (per 10% increment, ORmultivariable = 1.30; 95% CI, 1.14-1.48). The association was stronger among cases diagnosed within 2 years of follow-up. Adding liver function tests to OPN improved the discriminatory performance for subjects who developed HCC (AUC = 0.86). For cases diagnosed within 2 years, the combination of OPN and AFP was best able to predict HCC risk (AUC = 0.88). The best predictive model for HCC in this low-risk population is OPN in combination with liver function tests. Within 2 years of diagnosis, the combination of OPN and AFP best predicted HCC development, suggesting that measuring OPN and AFP could identify high-risk groups independently of a liver disease diagnosis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(9); 758-65.

PMID:
27339170
PMCID:
PMC5010922
DOI:
10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-15-0434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center