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Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2016 Jul;25(3):549-65. doi: 10.1016/j.chc.2016.02.005. Epub 2016 Mar 30.

Objective Testing: Urine and Other Drug Tests.

Author information

1
Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: scott.hadland@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Developmental Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

Drug testing, when carefully collected and thoughtfully interpreted, offers a critical adjunct to clinical care and substance use treatment. However, because test results can be misleading if not interpreted in the correct clinical context, clinicians should always conduct a careful interview with adolescent patients to understand what testing is likely to show and then use testing to validate or refute their expectations. Because of the ease with which samples can be tampered, providers should also carefully reflect on their own collection protocols and sample validation procedures to ensure optimal accuracy."

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Ethanol; Street drugs; Substance abuse detection; Substance-related disorders; Urine

PMID:
27338974
PMCID:
PMC4920965
DOI:
10.1016/j.chc.2016.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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