Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2017 Jun;4(3):515-522. doi: 10.1007/s40615-016-0253-9. Epub 2016 Jun 23.

Associations Between Cigarette Print Advertising and Smoking Initiation Among African Americans.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
2
School of Community and Global Health, Claremont Graduate University, 675 West Foothill Boulevard, Suite 310, Claremont, CA, 91711, USA. lyzette.blanco@cgu.edu.
3
Institute for Health Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
4
University of Hawaii Cancer Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, USA.
5
Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
6
Center for Alcohol & Drug Studies & Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this study was to examine changes in the annual number of cigarette advertisements in magazines with a predominantly African-American audience following the broadcast ban on tobacco, and whether fluctuations in cigarette print advertising targeting African Americans during the late-1970s until the mid-1980s were associated with declines in smoking initiation.

DESIGN:

We tabulated the annual number of cigarette advertisements from magazines with large African-American readerships (Ebony, Essence, and Jet) from 1960 to 1990. Advertisements were coded depending on whether they featured African-American models. We calculated the incidence rate of regular smoking initiation from 1975 to 1990 for African-American 14-25 years old using data from the 1992-1993, 1995-1996, 1998-1999, and 2001-2002 Tobacco Use Supplements of the Current Population Survey. We examined whether trends in smoking initiation coincided with trends in cigarette advertising practices among African Americans.

RESULTS:

The annual aggregated number of printed cigarette advertisements in Ebony, Essence, and Jet magazines increased at least five-fold starting in 1971, following the broadcast ban on cigarette advertising. A decrease in the percentage of ads by Brown & Williamson that showed African-American models was positively correlated (r = 0.30) with declines in the incidence rate of smoking initiation among African Americans from the late-1970s to the mid-1980s.

CONCLUSION:

The tobacco industry adapted quickly following the broadcast ban on cigarettes by increasing print advertising in African-American magazines. However, changes in print advertising practices by were associated with declines in smoking initiation among African Americans from the late-1970s to mid-1980s.

KEYWORDS:

Advertising; African Americans; Race/ethnicity; Tobacco

PMID:
27337978
DOI:
10.1007/s40615-016-0253-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for eScholarship, California Digital Library, University of California
Loading ...
Support Center