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Plant Cell. 2016 Jul;28(7):1510-20. doi: 10.1105/tpc.16.00196. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Advancing Crop Transformation in the Era of Genome Editing.

Author information

1
Agronomy Department, Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Florida, IFAS, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
2
Department of Plant Biology, Microbial and Plant Genomics Institute, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota 55108.
3
Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019.
4
U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agriculture Research Service, Western Regional Research Center, Albany, California 94710.
5
Enterprise Institute for Renewable Fuels, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63132.
6
Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794.
7
Natural Sciences Collegium, Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, Florida 33711.
8
Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907.
9
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724.
10
Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881.
11
Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720.
12
Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523.
13
Plant Transformation Research Center, University of California, Riverside, California 92521.
14
Plant Transformation Facility, University of California, Davis, California 95616.
15
The Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, New York 14853.
16
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development and Center for Genome Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455.
17
Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305.
18
Department of Agronomy and Center for Plant Transformation, Plant Sciences Institute, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011.
19
Plant Transformation Core Facility, Division of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211.
20
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 nealstewart@utk.edu.

Abstract

Plant transformation has enabled fundamental insights into plant biology and revolutionized commercial agriculture. Unfortunately, for most crops, transformation and regeneration remain arduous even after more than 30 years of technological advances. Genome editing provides novel opportunities to enhance crop productivity but relies on genetic transformation and plant regeneration, which are bottlenecks in the process. Here, we review the state of plant transformation and point to innovations needed to enable genome editing in crops. Plant tissue culture methods need optimization and simplification for efficiency and minimization of time in culture. Currently, specialized facilities exist for crop transformation. Single-cell and robotic techniques should be developed for high-throughput genomic screens. Plant genes involved in developmental reprogramming, wound response, and/or homologous recombination should be used to boost the recovery of transformed plants. Engineering universal Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains and recruiting other microbes, such as Ensifer or Rhizobium, could facilitate delivery of DNA and proteins into plant cells. Synthetic biology should be employed for de novo design of transformation systems. Genome editing is a potential game-changer in crop genetics when plant transformation systems are optimized.

PMID:
27335450
PMCID:
PMC4981132
DOI:
10.1105/tpc.16.00196
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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