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Biol Trace Elem Res. 2017 Feb;175(2):287-297. doi: 10.1007/s12011-016-0785-1. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Association Between Antioxidant Intake/Status and Obesity: a Systematic Review of Observational Studies.

Author information

1
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
2
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. A.Saedisomeolia@westernsydney.edu.au.
3
Department of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Richmond, NSW, Australia. A.Saedisomeolia@westernsydney.edu.au.
4
School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. A.Saedisomeolia@westernsydney.edu.au.
5
School of Medicine, Campbelltown Campus, Western Sydney University, Richmond, NSW, 2560, Australia. A.Saedisomeolia@westernsydney.edu.au.
6
School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

The global prevalence of obesity has doubled in recent decades. Compelling evidences indicated that obesity was associated with lower concentrations of specific antioxidants which may play a role in the development of obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease. The present review aimed to synthesize the evidence from studies on the association between obesity and antioxidant micronutrients in a systematic manner. Data bases including MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Cochrane were searched from inception to October 2015. Thirty-one articles were reviewed using the MOOSE checklist. Lower concentrations of antioxidants have been reported in obese individuals among age groups worldwide. Circulatory levels of carotenoids, vitamins E and C, as well as zinc, magnesium, and selenium were inversely correlated with obesity and body fat mass. However, studies demonstrated inconsistencies in findings. Lower status of carotenoids, vitamins E and C, zinc, magnesium, and selenium appears to be associated with adiposity. Intervention studies may be needed to establish the causality of these associations.

KEYWORDS:

Adiposity; Carotenoids; Obesity; Vitamin C; Vitamin E; Zinc

PMID:
27334437
DOI:
10.1007/s12011-016-0785-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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