Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychol Med. 2016 Sep;46(12):2501-12. doi: 10.1017/S0033291716001446. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Cortical GABA markers identify a molecular subtype of psychotic and bipolar disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry,University of Pittsburgh,Pittsburgh, PA,USA.
2
Department of Statistics,University of Pittsburgh,Pittsburgh, PA,USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Deficits in gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) neuron-related markers, including the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, the neuropeptide somatostatin, and the transcription factor Lhx6, are most pronounced in a subset of schizophrenia subjects identified as having a 'low GABA marker' (LGM) molecular phenotype. Furthermore, schizophrenia shares degrees of genetic liability, clinical features and cortical circuitry abnormalities with schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder. Therefore, we determined the extent to which a similar LGM molecular phenotype may also exist in subjects with these disorders.

METHOD:

Transcript levels for GAD67, parvalbumin, somatostatin, and Lhx6 were quantified using quantitative PCR in prefrontal cortex area 9 of 184 subjects with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 39), schizoaffective disorder (n = 23) or bipolar disorder (n = 35), or with a confirmed absence of any psychiatric diagnoses (n = 87). A blinded clustering approach was employed to determine the presence of a LGM molecular phenotype across all subjects.

RESULTS:

Approximately 49% of the subjects with schizophrenia, 48% of the subjects with schizoaffective disorder, and 29% of the subjects with bipolar disorder, but only 5% of unaffected subjects, clustered in the cortical LGM molecular phenotype.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support the characterization of psychotic and bipolar disorders by cortical molecular phenotype which may help elucidate more pathophysiologically informed and personalized medications.

KEYWORDS:

Inhibitory; postmortem; prefrontal cortex; schizoaffective; schizophrenia

PMID:
27328999
PMCID:
PMC5584051
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291716001446
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center