Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cereb Cortex. 2016 Sep;26(9):3669-80. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhw173. Epub 2016 Jun 19.

Neural Correlates of Auditory Figure-Ground Segregation Based on Temporal Coherence.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK Auditory Cognition Group, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK Current address: Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QX, UK.
2
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK Ear Institute, University College London, London WC1X 8EE, UK.
3
Ear Institute, University College London, London WC1X 8EE, UK.
4
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK Auditory Cognition Group, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK.

Abstract

To make sense of natural acoustic environments, listeners must parse complex mixtures of sounds that vary in frequency, space, and time. Emerging work suggests that, in addition to the well-studied spectral cues for segregation, sensitivity to temporal coherence-the coincidence of sound elements in and across time-is also critical for the perceptual organization of acoustic scenes. Here, we examine pre-attentive, stimulus-driven neural processes underlying auditory figure-ground segregation using stimuli that capture the challenges of listening in complex scenes where segregation cannot be achieved based on spectral cues alone. Signals ("stochastic figure-ground": SFG) comprised a sequence of brief broadband chords containing random pure tone components that vary from 1 chord to another. Occasional tone repetitions across chords are perceived as "figures" popping out of a stochastic "ground." Magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurement in naïve, distracted, human subjects revealed robust evoked responses, commencing from about 150 ms after figure onset that reflect the emergence of the "figure" from the randomly varying "ground." Neural sources underlying this bottom-up driven figure-ground segregation were localized to planum temporale, and the intraparietal sulcus, demonstrating that this area, outside the "classic" auditory system, is also involved in the early stages of auditory scene analysis."

KEYWORDS:

auditory cortex; auditory scene analysis; intraparietal sulcus; magnetoencephalography; segregation; temporal coherence

PMID:
27325682
PMCID:
PMC5004755
DOI:
10.1093/cercor/bhw173
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center