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J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2017 Jan/Feb;32(1):E8-E15. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000245.

Neurobehavioral Characteristics of Older Veterans With Remote Traumatic Brain Injury.

Author information

1
San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, California (Drs Peltz, Gardner, and Yaffe); NCIRE-The Veterans Health Research Institute, San Francisco, California (Drs Peltz and Yaffe); University of California, San Francisco (Drs Gardner, Kramer, and Yaffe); and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Rockville, Maryland (Drs Kenney and Diaz-Arrastia).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

While traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common across the life span, the detailed neurobehavioral characteristics of older adults with prior TBI remain unclear. Our goal was to compare the clinical profile of older independently living veterans with and without prior TBI.

SETTING:

Two veterans' retirement communities.

PARTICIPANTS:

Seventy-five participants with TBI and 71 without (mean age = 78 years).

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

MAIN MEASURES:

TBI history was determined by the Ohio State University TBI Questionnaire. We assessed psychiatric and medical history via interviews and chart review and conducted measures assessing functional/lifestyle, psychiatric, and cognitive outcomes. Regression analyses (adjusted for demographics, diabetes, prior depression, substance abuse, and site) were performed to compare between TBI and non-TBI participants.

RESULTS:

Compared with veterans without TBI, those with TBI had greater functional impairment (adjusted P = .05), endorsed more current depressive (adjusted P = .04) and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (adjusted P = .01), and had higher rates of prior depression and substance abuse (both adjusted Ps < .01). While composite memory and language scores did not differ between groups, participants with TBI performed worse on tests of executive functioning/processing speed (adjusted P = .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that TBI may have adverse long-term neurobehavioral consequences and that TBI-exposed adults may require careful screening and follow-up.

PMID:
27323220
PMCID:
PMC5164874
DOI:
10.1097/HTR.0000000000000245
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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