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Molecules. 2016 Jun 18;21(6). pii: E797. doi: 10.3390/molecules21060797.

Capsaicin, Nociception and Pain.

Author information

1
Department of Integrative Medical Biology, University of Umea, 901 87 Umea, Sweden. Barbara.F.Frias@umu.se.
2
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, I-10095 Grugliasco (TO), Italy. adalberto.merighi@unito.it.

Abstract

Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the hot chili pepper, is known to act on the transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is involved in somatic and visceral peripheral inflammation, in the modulation of nociceptive inputs to spinal cord and brain stem centers, as well as the integration of diverse painful stimuli. In this review, we first describe the chemical and pharmacological properties of capsaicin and its derivatives in relation to their analgesic properties. We then consider the biochemical and functional characteristics of TRPV1, focusing on its distribution and biological effects within the somatosensory and viscerosensory nociceptive systems. Finally, we discuss the use of capsaicin as an agonist of TRPV1 to model acute inflammation in slices and other ex vivo preparations.

KEYWORDS:

TRPV1 receptor; analgesia; capsaicin; nociception; resinferatoxin; sensitization; somatic pain; vanilloids; visceral pain

PMID:
27322240
PMCID:
PMC6273518
DOI:
10.3390/molecules21060797
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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