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Neurobiol Aging. 2016 Aug;44:53-61. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.04.011. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

(11)C-PBR28 binding to translocator protein increases with progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: wck2107@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
Office of the Clinical Director, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
Memory Disorders Program, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA.

Abstract

This longitudinal study sought to determine whether the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of neuroinflammation, increases over time in Alzheimer's disease. Positron emission tomography imaging with the TSPO radioligand (11)C-PBR28 was performed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 2.7 years in 14 amyloid-positive patients and 8 amyloid-negative controls. Patients had a greater increase in TSPO binding than controls in inferior parietal lobule, precuneus, occipital cortex, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and combined middle and inferior temporal cortex. TSPO binding in temporoparietal regions increased from 3.9% to 6.3% per annum in patients, but ranged from -0.5% to 1% per annum in controls. The change in TSPO binding correlated with cognitive worsening on clinical dementia rating scale-sum of boxes and reduced cortical volume. The annual rate of increased TSPO binding in temporoparietal regions was about 5-fold higher in patients with clinical progression (n = 9) compared with those who did not progress (n = 5). TSPO may serve as a biomarker of Alzheimer's progression and response to anti-inflammatory therapies.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00955422 NCT00613119.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Neuroinflammation; PET imaging

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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