Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Carbohydr Polym. 2016 Oct 5;150:369-77. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.05.024. Epub 2016 May 11.

Influence of a cationic polysaccharide on starch functionality.

Author information

1
QOPNA Research Unit and Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal. Electronic address: josiane.raguzzoni@gmail.com.
2
QOPNA Research Unit and Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal. Electronic address: ivonne@ua.pt.
3
QOPNA Research Unit and Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal. Electronic address: jals@ua.pt.

Abstract

Fundamental rheology, differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy have been used to evaluate the effect of a cationic polysaccharide, chitosan, on the gelatinization, gel formation and retrogradation of maize starch samples, under acidic aqueous conditions. Moderate acidic conditions (0.1molL(-1) acetic acid) have shown a (slight) positive effect on starch gelatinization process and structure development. The presence of chitosan increased the DSC onset gelatinization temperature and also shifted the onset of the storage modulus increase to higher temperatures. Formation of the starch gel, mainly gelation of the leached-out amylose, is somehow hindered by the presence of the cationic polysaccharide and, therefore, the retrogradation of starch at very early stage can be delayed by addition of chitosan. However, long-term retrogradation was slightly increased. FTIR pectroscopy did not reveal any significant interaction between both polysaccharides what is in accordance with the observed rheological behavior. Small additions of chitosan to starch-rich systems may be a useful strategy to obtain new textures with novel phase transition behaviors.

KEYWORDS:

Chitosan; Dynamic rheological properties; Gelation; Maize starch; Retrogradation; Thermal properties

PMID:
27312647
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.05.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center