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Occup Environ Med. 2016 Aug;73(8):520-7. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2016-103597. Epub 2016 Jun 16.

Night shift work and stomach cancer risk in the MCC-Spain study.

Author information

1
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain.
2
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
3
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain.
4
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain Department of Epidemiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
5
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain Centro de Investigación en Salud y Medio Ambiente (CYSMA), Universidad de Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
6
Unit of Infections and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain Department of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
7
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain Environmental and Cancer Epidemiology Area, National Center of Epidemiology, Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain Cancer Epidemiology Research Group, Oncology and Hematology Area, IIS Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, Spain.
8
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain Grupo de Investigación en Interacciones Gen-Ambiente y Salud, Universidad de León, León, Spain.
9
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain.
10
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain Unit of Biomarkers and Susceptibility, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
11
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain University of Cantabria-IDIVAL, Santander, Spain.
12
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain IUOPA, Universidad de Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.
13
Fundación para el Fomento de la Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de la Comunidad Valenciana (FISABIO), Valencia, Spain.
14
Centro de Investigación en Salud y Medio Ambiente (CYSMA), Universidad de Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
15
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain.
16
University of Cantabria-IDIVAL, Santander, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Night shift work has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, based on experimental studies and limited evidence on human breast cancer risk. Evidence at other cancer sites is scarce. We evaluated the association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk in a population-based case-control study.

METHODS:

A total of 374 incident stomach adenocarcinoma cases and 2481 population controls were included from the MCC-Spain study. Detailed data on lifetime night shift work were collected including permanent and rotating shifts, and their cumulative duration (years). Adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were used in analysis.

RESULTS:

A total of 25.7% of cases and 22.5% of controls reported ever being a night shift worker. There was a weak positive, non-significant association between ever having had worked for at least 1 year in permanent night shifts and stomach cancer risk compared to never having worked night shifts (OR=1.2, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.8). However, there was an inverse 'U' shaped relationship with cumulative duration of permanent night shifts, with the highest risk observed in the intermediate duration category (OR 10-20 years=2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.6) (p for trend=0.19). There was no association with ever having had worked in rotating night shifts (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.2) and no trend according to cumulative duration (p for trend=0.68).

CONCLUSION:

We found no clear evidence concerning an association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk.

KEYWORDS:

Night shift work; Spain; case-control study; stomach cancer

PMID:
27312400
DOI:
10.1136/oemed-2016-103597
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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