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Infect Genet Evol. 2016 Oct;44:69-75. doi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2016.06.026. Epub 2016 Jun 14.

More parasitic myositis cases in humans in Australia, and the definition of genetic markers for the causative agents as a basis for molecular diagnosis.

Author information

1
Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
Australian National Wildlife Collection, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Canberra, Australia.
3
Pathology Queensland, Townsville Hospital, Queensland, Australia.
4
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Royal Hobart Hospital, Tasmania, Australia.
5
Department of Neurology, The Townsville Hospital, Queensland, Australia.
6
Anatomical Pathology, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia; Department of Molecular and Cellular Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Queensland 4006, Australia.
7
Electron Microscope Unit, Pathology Queensland, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Queensland, Australia.
8
School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, North Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: r.bradbury@cqu.edu.au.
9
Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: robinbg@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

Since 1998, there have been six reported human cases of myositis in Australia, attributable to infection with the nematode Haycocknema perplexum. However, an unequivocal diagnosis of H. perplexum infection and associated disease has been seriously compromised by a lack of molecular markers for this nematode. Here, we report new cases of disseminated myositis in two male patients from the states of Queensland and Tasmania in Australia, respectively; genetically characterize the causative agent from each case; and, also establish a PCR-based sequencing approach as a tool to support the diagnosis of future cases and to underpin epidemiological studies.

KEYWORDS:

Australia; Disseminated myositis; Haycocknema perplexum; Human; Nematode

PMID:
27312103
DOI:
10.1016/j.meegid.2016.06.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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