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Sci Transl Med. 2016 Jun 15;8(343):343ra82. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aad7121.

Antibiotics, birth mode, and diet shape microbiome maturation during early life.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA. Department of Population Health, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
3
Division of Biostatistics, Department of Population Health and Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA. Department of Microbiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
6
Department of Microbiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
7
Department of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA. Department of Microbiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA. New York Harbor Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, New York, NY 10010, USA. martin.blaser@nyumc.org.

Abstract

Early childhood is a critical stage for the foundation and development of both the microbiome and host. Early-life antibiotic exposures, cesarean section, and formula feeding could disrupt microbiome establishment and adversely affect health later in life. We profiled microbial development during the first 2 years of life in a cohort of 43 U.S. infants and identified multiple disturbances associated with antibiotic exposures, cesarean section, and formula feeding. These exposures contributed to altered establishment of maternal bacteria, delayed microbiome development, and altered α-diversity. These findings illustrate the complexity of early-life microbiome development and its sensitivity to perturbation.

Comment in

PMID:
27306664
PMCID:
PMC5308924
DOI:
10.1126/scitranslmed.aad7121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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