Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sleep. 2016 Aug 1;39(8):1555-62. doi: 10.5665/sleep.6020.

Sleep Duration Associated with the Lowest Risk of Depression/Anxiety in Adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Physical and Health Education, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kochi University School of Medicine, Kochi, Japan.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To investigate sleep duration associated with the least depression/anxiety in adolescence.

METHODS:

Grades 7-12 Japanese students (n = 18,250, aged 12-18 y) from public junior high/high schools were studied in a cross-sectional design. Due to missing/implausible data, 15,637 out of the 18,250 students were statistically analyzed. Relationship between sleep duration on school nights and depression/anxiety, measured using self-report questionnaires, including the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), were studied by sex and grade, controlling for bedtime regularity.

RESULTS:

When sleep duration was classified by 1-h intervals, rate of adolescents with a GHQ-12 score ≥ 4 was the lowest in males and females who slept 8.5-9.5 h and 7.5-8.5 h, respectively, (designated "references") in both grades 7-9 and 10-12. The rate was significantly higher than the references in both males and females who slept < 7.5 h, regardless of grade (P < 0.05, logistic regression). GHQ-12 tended to be worse in adolescents (2.0%-13.5%) who slept longer than the references. Sleep duration for the minimum GHQ-12 score was estimated to be 8.8 and 8.5 h in males, and 8.0 and 7.5 h in females, in grades 7-9 and 10-12, respectively, using the General Additive Model.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep duration of ≥ 8.5 h on school nights may be associated with the lowest risk of depression/anxiety on average in male adolescents. Although the duration was estimated to be shorter in females (≥ 7.5 h) than males, this should be interpreted carefully. Most adolescents may currently be sleeping less than the optimal duration.

COMMENTARY:

A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1491.

KEYWORDS:

General Health Questionnaire-12; adolescents; age; mental health; sex; sleep duration

PMID:
27306271
PMCID:
PMC4945315
DOI:
10.5665/sleep.6020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center