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J Sch Nurs. 2016 Dec;32(6):416-422. Epub 2016 Jun 14.

The Sensitivity of Adolescent School-Based Hearing Screens Is Significantly Improved by Adding High Frequencies.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA dsekhar@hmc.psu.edu.
2
Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA, USA.
3
Pediatric Clinical Research Office, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.
4
Department of Audiology, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.
5
Cochlear Americas, Centennial, CO, USA.
6
Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

Abstract

High frequency hearing loss (HFHL), often related to hazardous noise, affects one in six U.S. adolescents. Yet, only 20 states include school-based hearing screens for adolescents. Only six states test multiple high frequencies. Study objectives were to (1) compare the sensitivity of state school-based hearing screens for adolescents to gold standard sound-treated booth testing and (2) consider the effect of adding multiple high frequencies and two-step screening on sensitivity/specificity. Of 134 eleventh-grade participants (2013-2014), 43 of the 134 (32%) did not pass sound-treated booth testing, and 27 of the 43 (63%) had HFHL. Sensitivity/specificity of the most common protocol (1,000, 2,000, 4,000 Hz at 20 dB HL) for these hearing losses was 25.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = [13.5, 41.2]) and 85.7% (95% CI [76.8, 92.2]), respectively. A protocol including 500, 1,000, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000 Hz at 20 dB HL significantly improved sensitivity to 76.7% (95% CI [61.4, 88.2]), p < .001. Two-step screening maintained specificity (84.6%, 95% CI [75.5, 91.3]). Adolescent school-based hearing screen sensitivity improves with high frequencies.

KEYWORDS:

adolescent health; hearing loss; hearing screen; school nursing; school-based clinics

PMID:
27302960
DOI:
10.1177/1059840516654004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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