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Development. 2016 Jun 15;143(12):2056-65. doi: 10.1242/dev.127886.

Extracellular matrix motion and early morphogenesis.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
2
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA.
3
Department of Anatomy, Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC 20059, USA.
4
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA Department of Biological Physics, Eotvos University, Budapest 1117, Hungary.
5
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS (UMR 7104), Inserm U964, Université de Strasbourg, Illkirch Graffenstaden 67400, France.
6
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA clittle@kumc.edu.

Abstract

For over a century, embryologists who studied cellular motion in early amniotes generally assumed that morphogenetic movement reflected migration relative to a static extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold. However, as we discuss in this Review, recent investigations reveal that the ECM is also moving during morphogenesis. Time-lapse studies show how convective tissue displacement patterns, as visualized by ECM markers, contribute to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Computational image analysis distinguishes between cell-autonomous (active) displacements and convection caused by large-scale (composite) tissue movements. Modern quantification of large-scale 'total' cellular motion and the accompanying ECM motion in the embryo demonstrates that a dynamic ECM is required for generation of the emergent motion patterns that drive amniote morphogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

Amniote morphogenesis; Emergent patterns; Extracellular matrix dynamics; Tissue-scale motion

PMID:
27302396
PMCID:
PMC4920166
DOI:
10.1242/dev.127886
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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