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Intern Emerg Med. 2017 Jun;12(4):513-518. doi: 10.1007/s11739-016-1481-z. Epub 2016 Jun 14.

Cross-over study of novice intubators performing endotracheal intubation in an upright versus supine position.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, 720 Eskenazi Avenue, Fifth Third Faculty Office Building, 3rd Floor Emergency Medicine Office, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA. turnjose@iu.edu.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, 720 Eskenazi Avenue, Fifth Third Faculty Office Building, 3rd Floor Emergency Medicine Office, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA.
3
Carolinas Medical Center Emergency Medicine Residency, Medical Education Bldg., Third Floor 1000 Blythe Blvd., Charlotte, NC, 28203, USA.
4
Department of Anesthesia, Indiana University School of Medicine, Fesler Hall Room 204, 1130 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5115, USA.
5
Southern Illinois University Emergency Medicine Residency, 801 North Rutledge, PO Box 19638, Springfield, IL, 62794-9638, USA.

Abstract

There are a number of potential physical advantages to performing orotracheal intubation in an upright position. The objective of this study was to measure the success of intubation of a simulated patient in an upright versus supine position by novice intubators after brief training. This was a cross-over design study in which learners (medical students, physician assistant students, and paramedic students) intubated mannequins in both a supine (head of the bed at 0°) and upright (head of bed elevated at 45°) position. The primary outcome of interest was successful intubation of the trachea. Secondary outcomes included log time to intubation, Cormack-Lehane view obtained, Percent of Glottic Opening score, provider assessment of difficulty, and overall provider satisfaction with the position. There were a total of 126 participants: 34 medical students, 84 physician assistant students, and 8 paramedic students. Successful tracheal intubation was achieved in 114 supine attempts (90.5 %) and 123 upright attempts (97.6 %; P = 0.283). Upright positioning was associated with significantly faster log time to intubation, higher likelihood of achieving Grade I Cormack-Lehane view, higher Percent of Glottic Opening score, lower perceived difficulty, and higher provider satisfaction. A subset of 74 participants had no previous intubation training or experience. For these providers, there was a non-significant trend toward improved intubation success with upright positioning vs supine positioning (98.6 % vs. 87.8 %, P = 0.283). For all secondary outcomes in this group, upright positioning significantly outperformed supine positioning.

KEYWORDS:

Airway management; Education; Intubation; Simulation

PMID:
27300036
DOI:
10.1007/s11739-016-1481-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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