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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Jun 28;113(26):7243-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1606537113. Epub 2016 Jun 13.

Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

Author information

1
Institute of Neuroscience, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China; Graduate School of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China; Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Department of Biochemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Department of Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158;
2
Institute of Neuroscience, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China; Graduate School of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;
3
Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Department of Biochemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Department of Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158;
4
Department of Cellular Neurobiology, University of Göttingen, 37077 Goettingen, Germany;
5
College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China;
6
Institute of Neuroscience, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China;
7
Department of Biology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
8
Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Department of Biochemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Department of Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158; yuhnung.jan@ucsf.edu zuorenwang@ion.ac.cn.
9
Institute of Neuroscience, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China; yuhnung.jan@ucsf.edu zuorenwang@ion.ac.cn.

Abstract

Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs.

KEYWORDS:

locomotion; mechanosensation; proprioception

PMID:
27298354
PMCID:
PMC4932980
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1606537113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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