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Respir Med. 2016 Jul;116:1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2016.05.001. Epub 2016 May 3.

Non CF-bronchiectasis: Aetiologic approach, clinical, radiological, microbiological and functional profile in 277 patients.

Author information

1
5th Respiratory Medicine Department, "Sotiria" Hospital of Chest Diseases, Athens, Greece.
2
6th Respiratory Medicine Department, "Sotiria" Hospital of Chest Diseases, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: xristina.triantafyllidou@gmail.com.
3
6th Respiratory Medicine Department, "Sotiria" Hospital of Chest Diseases, Athens, Greece.
4
Department of Radiology, Evgenideion Hospital, Athens, Greece.
5
1st Department of Respiratory Medicine, Medical School of National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, "Sotiria" Hospital of Chest Diseases, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Non-Cystic Fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis is common in Greece but little attention has been paid to the investigation of its aetiology, clinical, radiological, microbiological and lung function profile.

METHODS:

We prospectively evaluated patients with non-CF bronchiectasis confirmed by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest. Aetiology, clinical data, radiology score, microbiological profile and lung function were investigated.

RESULTS:

We evaluated 277 patients (170 women) with bronchiectasis (mean age: 60.5 ± 16 years), 64% of them being non-smokers. Post-infectious (25.2%) and past tuberculosis (TB) (22.3%) were the most commonly identified underlying conditions, while no cause was found in 34% of the patients. The main symptoms were cough (82%), mucopurulent sputum (80%), dyspnea (60%) and haemoptysis (37%). Mean duration of symptoms was 9.7 (SD 10.7) years. Infectious exacerbations were observed in 67.5% of the patients with a mean frequency of 2.3 (SD 1.4) per year. The most frequent lung function pattern was the obstructive (43.1%) while 38% of the patients had normal spirometry. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common pathogen yielded in sputum cultures (43%) followed by Haemophilus influenzae (12.6%). Patients with P. aeruginosa had a more long-standing disease and worse lung function. Radiological severity of the disease was mainly related to impaired lung function, P. aeruginosa isolation in sputum and frequent exacerbations.

CONCLUSION:

Data indicate that in Greece, "past" tuberculosis remains an important cause of bronchiectasis. P. aeruginosa was the predominant pathogen in the airways, associated with disease severity, while the most common lung function impairment was obstruction.

KEYWORDS:

Bronchiectasis; Epidemiology; Lung function; Microbiology; Radiology

PMID:
27296814
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2016.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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