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Sci Rep. 2016 Jun 13;6:28009. doi: 10.1038/srep28009.

Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction.

Author information

1
Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.
2
National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA.
4
School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Malawi College of Medicine, Blantyre, Malawi.
5
Sight and Life,, CH-4002, Basel, Switzerland.
6
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Abstract

Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12-59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity.

PMID:
27294788
PMCID:
PMC4904796
DOI:
10.1038/srep28009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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