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J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2016 Sep;3(3):457-65. doi: 10.1007/s40615-015-0158-z. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

Factors Associated with Exercise Motivation among African-American Men.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Biomathematics, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA.
3
College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA. t_r_taylor@howard.edu.
5
College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA. t_r_taylor@howard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The primary aims of this study were to: (1) characterize exercise stages of change among a sample of African-American men, (2) determine if exercise motivation was associated with self-reported exercise behavior, and (3) examine if groups of personal (i.e., age, BMI, income, educational attainment, and perceived health), psycho-social (i.e., exercise self-efficacy, personality type, social influence), and environmental factors (i.e., neighborhood safety) predicted stages of change for physical exercise among African-American men.

METHODS:

One hundred seventy African-American male participants were recruited for this study (age: 47.63(10.23) years). Participants completed a self-report questionnaire assessing study variables. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine the association of exercise stages of change with an array of personal, psychosocial, and environmental factors.

RESULTS:

BMI, exercise self-efficacy, and nighttime neighborhood safety were entered as independent variables in the full model. BMI and exercise self-efficacy continued to be significant predictors of exercise stages of change in the full model. Obese men had a 9.24 greater odds of being in the action stage of change than in the maintenance stage. Also, men reporting greater exercise self-efficacy had lower odds of being in the lower stages of change categories (pre-preparation, preparation, and action) than in the maintenance stage.

CONCLUSION:

Our results confirmed that using an ecological framework explained more of the variance in exercise stages of change than any of the individual components alone. Information gleaned from this study could inform interventionists of the best ways to create tailored exercise programs for African-American men.

KEYWORDS:

African-Americans; Exercise; Stages of change

PMID:
27294741
DOI:
10.1007/s40615-015-0158-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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