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Neuroimage. 2016 Oct 1;139:65-73. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.06.012. Epub 2016 Jun 9.

T2-prepared velocity selective labelling: A novel idea for full-brain mapping of oxygen saturation.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Room KE04.123.1, PO Box 85090, 3584 AE, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: t.alderliesten-3@umcutrecht.nl.
2
Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Room KE04.123.1, PO Box 85090, 3584 AE, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: J.deVis-2@umcutrecht.nl.
3
Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Room KE04.123.1, PO Box 85090, 3584 AE, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: p.lemmers@umcutrecht.nl.
4
Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Room KE04.123.1, PO Box 85090, 3584 AE, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: f.vanbel@umcutrecht.nl.
5
Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Room KE04.123.1, PO Box 85090, 3584 AE, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: manonbenders@gmail.com.
6
Department of Radiology,University Medical Center Utrecht, Room: E.01.132, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: j.hendrikse@umcutrecht.nl.
7
Department of Radiology,University Medical Center Utrecht, Room: E.01.132, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Denmark. Electronic address: Esben.thade.petersen@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

Disturbances in cerebral oxygenation saturation (SO2) have been linked to adverse outcome in adults, children, and neonates. In intensive care, the cerebral SO2 is increasingly being monitored by Near-InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Unfortunately NIRS has a limited penetration depth. The "modified T2-prepared Blood Imaging of Oxygen Saturation" (T2-BIOS) MR sequence provides a step towards full brain SO2 measurement.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Tissue SO2, and venous SO2 (SvO2) were obtained simultaneously by T2-BIOS during a respiratory challenge in ten healthy volunteers. These two measures were compared to SO2 that was obtained by a single probe MR-compatible NIRS setup, and to cerebral blood flow and venous SO2 that were obtained by arterial spin labelling and T2-TRIR, respectively.

RESULTS:

SO2-T2-BIOS and SO2-NIRS had a mean bias of -4.0% (95% CI -21.3% to 13.3%). SvO2-T2-BIOS correlated with SO2-NIRS (R2=0.41, p=0.002) and SvO2-T2-TRIR (R2=0.87, p=0.002). In addition, SO2-NIRS correlated with SvO2-T2-TRIR (R2=0.85, p=0.003) Frontal cerebral blood flow correlated with SO2-T2-BIOS (R2=0.21, p=0.04), but was not significant in relation to SO2-NIRS.

DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION:

Full brain SO2 assessment by any technique may help validating NIRS and may prove useful in guiding the clinical management of patient populations with cerebral injury following hypoxic-ischaemic events. The agreement between NIRS and T2-BIOS provides confidence in measuring cerebral SO2 by either technique. As it stands now, the T2-BIOS represents a novel idea and future work will focus on improvements to make it a reliable tool for SO2 assessment.

KEYWORDS:

Adults; Cerebral oxygenation; Near-Infrared Spectroscopy; Respiratory challenge

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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