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Sci Rep. 2016 Jun 13;6:27754. doi: 10.1038/srep27754.

Ocular exposure to blue-enriched light has an asymmetric influence on neural activity and spatial attention.

Author information

1
Monash Institute for Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences (MICCN), School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
2
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, USA and Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
3
School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
4
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
5
Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.
6
Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso, Cuiaba, Brazil.
7
School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
8
School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.

Abstract

Brain networks subserving alertness in humans interact with those for spatial attention orienting. We employed blue-enriched light to directly manipulate alertness in healthy volunteers. We show for the first time that prior exposure to higher, relative to lower, intensities of blue-enriched light speeds response times to left, but not right, hemifield visual stimuli, via an asymmetric effect on right-hemisphere parieto-occipital α-power. Our data give rise to the tantalising possibility of light-based interventions for right hemisphere disorders of spatial attention.

PMID:
27291291
PMCID:
PMC4904199
DOI:
10.1038/srep27754
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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