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Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci. 2016;140:151-84. doi: 10.1016/bs.pmbts.2016.02.002.

Epigenetics of Obesity.

Author information

1
Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, Medical Genetics Laboratories, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; Doctoral School in Genetics, Oncology, and Clinical Medicine; University of Siena; Siena, Italy.
2
European Cancer and Environment Research Institute (ECERI), Bruxelles, Belgium; ISDE International Society of Doctors for Environment (Scientific Office), Arezzo, Italy.
3
Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, Medical Genetics Laboratories, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: lucia.migliore@med.unipi.it.

Abstract

Obesity is a metabolic disease, which is becoming an epidemic health problem: it has been recently defined in terms of Global Pandemic. Over the years, the approaches through family, twins and adoption studies led to the identification of some causal genes in monogenic forms of obesity but the origins of the pandemic of obesity cannot be considered essentially due to genetic factors, because human genome is not likely to change in just a few years. Epigenetic studies have offered in recent years valuable tools for the understanding of the worldwide spread of the pandemic of obesity. The involvement of epigenetic modifications-DNA methylation, histone tails, and miRNAs modifications-in the development of obesity is more and more evident. In the epigenetic literature, there are evidences that the entire embryo-fetal and perinatal period of development plays a key role in the programming of all human organs and tissues. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms involved in the epigenetic programming require a new and general pathogenic paradigm, the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease theory, to explain the current epidemiological transition, that is, the worldwide increase of chronic, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Obesity and its related complications are more and more associated with environmental pollutants (obesogens), gut microbiota modifications and unbalanced food intake, which can induce, through epigenetic mechanisms, weight gain, and altered metabolic consequences.

KEYWORDS:

DNA methylation; epigenetics; nutrition; obesity; obesogens; transgenerational effects

PMID:
27288829
DOI:
10.1016/bs.pmbts.2016.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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