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Science. 2016 Jun 10;352(6291):1319-22. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3358.

Cell-specific restoration of stimulus preference after monocular deprivation in the visual cortex.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany. trose@neuro.mpg.de tobias.bonhoeffer@neuro.mpg.de.
2
Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany.

Abstract

Monocular deprivation evokes a prominent shift of neuronal responses in the visual cortex toward the open eye, accompanied by functional and structural synaptic rearrangements. This shift is reversible, but it is unknown whether the recovery happens at the level of individual neurons or whether it reflects a population effect. We used ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging to follow the activity of the same excitatory layer 2/3 neurons in the mouse visual cortex over months during repeated episodes of ocular dominance (OD) plasticity. We observed robust shifts toward the open eye in most neurons. Nevertheless, these cells faithfully returned to their pre-deprivation OD during binocular recovery. Moreover, the initial network correlation structure was largely recovered, suggesting that functional connectivity may be regained despite prominent experience-dependent plasticity.

PMID:
27284193
DOI:
10.1126/science.aad3358
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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