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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2016 Aug;117(2):158-162.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.anai.2016.05.018. Epub 2016 Jun 7.

Prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Allergy/Immunology Section, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: Mahboobeh_mahdavinia@rush.edu.
2
Division of Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine Department, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
3
Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Allergy/Immunology Section, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
5
Division of Allergy-Immunology, Internal Medicine Department, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An association between chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been previously reported; however, the underlying factors linking CRS and GERD remain to be elucidated.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the association of GERD and CRS using prospective and retrospective approaches.

METHODS:

The retrospective study comprised a large cohort of CRS cases, whereas the prospective arm evaluated a series of CRS cases and controls.

RESULTS:

In the retrospective arm of the study, of the 1066 patients with CRS, 112 (10.5%) had GERD. Among patients with CRS, GERD was associated with higher body mass index, older age, and female sex. The odds ratios (ORs) for asthma and allergic rhinitis in the CRS group with GERD compared with the CRS group without GERD were 2.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.905-4.389) and 2.021 (95% CI, 1.035-3.947). Furthermore, GERD was associated with a greater duration of CRS. Ninety patients with CRS and 81 controls were enrolled in the prospective arm of the study. In the CRS group, GERD was associated with asthma (OR, 4.77; 95% CI, 1.27-18.01). Patients with CRS and GERD had a longer duration and a younger age at onset of CRS. In controls, no association was found between GERD and asthma (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.09-5.19) or allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.05-2.59).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with CRS and GERD are more likely to have atopic conditions and asthma when compared with patients with CRS but without GERD. One of the potential explanations of this link is that comorbid GERD and atopic disease are potential risk factors for development of CRS.

PMID:
27283453
PMCID:
PMC5514562
DOI:
10.1016/j.anai.2016.05.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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