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Maturitas. 2016 Aug;90:49-57. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.05.006. Epub 2016 May 10.

The genetics of exceptional longevity: Insights from centenarians.

Author information

1
Research Institute of Hospital 12 de Octubre ('i+12'), Madrid, Spain; GIDFYS, Department of Health Sciences, European University Miguel de Cervantes, Valladolid, Spain.
2
School of Health Sciences, University of León, Spain.
3
Research Institute of Hospital 12 de Octubre ('i+12'), Madrid, Spain; European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
4
Research Institute of Hospital 12 de Octubre ('i+12'), Madrid, Spain.
5
IRyS Group, Physical Education School, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile.
6
Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, León, Spain.
7
Research Institute of Hospital 12 de Octubre ('i+12'), Madrid, Spain; Departamento de Fisiatría y Enfermería, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud y del Deporte, GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) research group, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón -IA2- (Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA), Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: nuria.garatachea@unizar.es.

Abstract

As the world population ages, so the prevalence increases of individuals aged 100 years or more, known as centenarians. Reaching this age has been described as exceptional longevity (EL) and is attributed to both genetic and environmental factors. Many genetic variations known to affect life expectancy exist in centenarians. This review of studies conducted on centenarians and supercentenarians (older than 110 years) updates knowledge of the impacts on longevity of the twenty most widely investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

KEYWORDS:

Genetics; Longevity

PMID:
27282794
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.05.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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