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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Sep;26(9):773-7. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2016.04.007. Epub 2016 Apr 20.

Higher visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio is associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA. Electronic address: fialhoa@ccf.org.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

There is a lack of studies evaluating the association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and abdominal fat. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether visceral fat area (VFA), subcutaneous fat area (SFA) or visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio (VFA/SFA ratio) were associated with SIBO.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

In this case-control study, 152 eligible patients submitted to glucose hydrogen/methane breath test who also had computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen performed were included. Clinical and demographic information was obtained. VFA and SFA were measured using Image J software at lumbar 3 level on CT cross-sectional image of the 152 patients included in this study, 68 patients (44.7%) tested positive for SIBO. In the univariate analysis, the presence of SIBO was associated with older age (65.2 ± 1.5 vs. 59.3 ± 1.5, p = 0.007); type 2 diabetes mellitus (33.8% vs. 17.9%; p = 0.019); hypertension (63.2% vs. 39.3%; p = 0.003); metabolic syndrome (85.3% vs. 64.3%; p = 0.003); and higher VFA/SFA ratio (1.0 ± 0.1 vs. 0.7 ± 0.1; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-5.7; p = 0.035) and higher VFA/SFA ratio (OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.6-7.2; p = 0.002) remained independently associated with SIBO.

CONCLUSION:

The presence of SIBO was found to be associated with high VFA/SFA ratio measured from cross-sectional CT image.

KEYWORDS:

Obesity; Small intestine bacterial overgrowth; Visceral fat

PMID:
27282099
DOI:
10.1016/j.numecd.2016.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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