Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Host Microbe. 2016 Jun 8;19(6):874-81. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2016.05.012.

Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena 07743, Germany.
2
Laboratory of Paleoanthropology & Paleogenetics, Kazan Federal University, Kazan 420008, Russian Federation; Institute of Archaeology named after A. Kh. Khalikov, Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Kazan 420012, Russian Federation.
3
Department of Archeological Sciences, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72070, Germany.
4
PACEA, CNRS Institute, Université de Bordeaux, Pessac 33615, France.
5
Museu de Historia de Barcelona, Barcelona 08002, Spain.
6
State Office for Cultural Heritage Management Baden-Württemberg, Esslingen 73728, Germany.
7
Department of Archeological Sciences, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72070, Germany; State Office for Cultural Heritage Management Baden-Württemberg, Osteology, Konstanz 78467, Germany.
8
Institute of Archaeology named after A. Kh. Khalikov, Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Kazan 420012, Russian Federation.
9
Institute of Geology and Petroleum Technologies, Kazan Federal University, Kazan 420008, Russian Federation.
10
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena 07743, Germany. Electronic address: herbig@shh.mpg.de.
11
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena 07743, Germany. Electronic address: bos@shh.mpg.de.
12
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena 07743, Germany; Department of Archeological Sciences, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen 72070, Germany. Electronic address: krause@shh.mpg.de.

Abstract

Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct.

PMID:
27281573
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2016.05.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center