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Schizophr Bull. 2016 Sep;42(5):1110-23. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbw078. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Auditory Hallucinations and the Brain's Resting-State Networks: Findings and Methodological Observations.

Author information

1
Psychology Department, Durham University, Durham, UK; benjamin.alderson-day@durham.ac.uk.
2
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK;
3
Psychology Department, Durham University, Durham, UK;
4
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA;
5
New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY;
6
Max Planck Research Group for Neuroanatomy & Connectivity, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany;
7
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland;
8
Mind, Brain Imaging and Neuroethics Research Unit, The Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada;
9
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA;
10
Department of Psychology, Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA;
11
Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands;
12
Center for Mindfulness, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA;
13
North Metro Health Service Mental Health, Graylands Health Campus, School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia;
14
Univ Lille, CNRS (UMR 9193), SCALab & CHU Lille, Psychiatry dept. (CURE), Lille, France.

Abstract

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the potential for alterations to the brain's resting-state networks (RSNs) to explain various kinds of psychopathology. RSNs provide an intriguing new explanatory framework for hallucinations, which can occur in different modalities and population groups, but which remain poorly understood. This collaboration from the International Consortium on Hallucination Research (ICHR) reports on the evidence linking resting-state alterations to auditory hallucinations (AH) and provides a critical appraisal of the methodological approaches used in this area. In the report, we describe findings from resting connectivity fMRI in AH (in schizophrenia and nonclinical individuals) and compare them with findings from neurophysiological research, structural MRI, and research on visual hallucinations (VH). In AH, various studies show resting connectivity differences in left-hemisphere auditory and language regions, as well as atypical interaction of the default mode network and RSNs linked to cognitive control and salience. As the latter are also evident in studies of VH, this points to a domain-general mechanism for hallucinations alongside modality-specific changes to RSNs in different sensory regions. However, we also observed high methodological heterogeneity in the current literature, affecting the ability to make clear comparisons between studies. To address this, we provide some methodological recommendations and options for future research on the resting state and hallucinations.

KEYWORDS:

default mode network; fMRI; perception; psychosis; schizophrenia

PMID:
27280452
PMCID:
PMC4988751
DOI:
10.1093/schbul/sbw078
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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