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Jundishapur J Microbiol. 2016 Mar 14;9(4):e32356. doi: 10.5812/jjm.32356. eCollection 2016 Apr.

Differences in the Biodiversity of the Fecal Microbiota of Infants With Rotaviral Diarrhea and Healthy Infants.

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1
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, College of Food Science and Engineering, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rotaviral diarrhea (RD) has been associated with the biodiversity of the fecal microbiota in infants; however, the differences in the biodiversity of the fecal microbiota between infants with RD and healthy (H) infants have not been clearly elucidated.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to reveal the changes in the biodiversity of the fecal microbiota of infants with RD.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

For this study, 30 fecal samples from 15 RD infants and 15 H infants were collected. The biodiversity of the fecal microbiota from the two groups was compared via polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and gene sequencing.

RESULTS:

The Shannon-Weaver index showed that the biodiversity of the fecal microbiota from the RD infants was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that from the H infants. All fifteen RD infants were grouped into one cluster and were separated from the H infants by the un weighted-pair group method, with the arithmetic average (UPGMA) clustering algorithm. In addition, when compared with the healthy infants, the communities of the dominant microbes, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, in the fecal microbiota from the RD infants have obviously changed.

CONCLUSIONS:

With regard to improving the understanding of the differences in the biodiversity of the fecal microbiota between RD infants and H infants, the findings of this study can provide a possible basis to reveal the relationship between RD and intestinal microbiota.

KEYWORDS:

Biodiversity; DGGE; Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis; Fecal; Infants; Microbiota; Rotaviral Diarrhea

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