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Cell Death Dis. 2016 Jun 9;7(6):e2256. doi: 10.1038/cddis.2016.159.

PAX7 is a required target for microRNA-206-induced differentiation of fusion-negative rhabdomyosarcoma.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.
2
Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.
3
St. Jude Proteomics Facility, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.
4
Department of Structural Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.
5
Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

Abstract

Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood. RMS can be parsed based on clinical outcome into two subtypes, fusion-positive RMS (FP-RMS) or fusion-negative RMS (FN-RMS) based on the presence or absence of either PAX3-FOXO1 or PAX7-FOXO1 gene fusions. In both RMS subtypes, tumor cells show histology and a gene expression pattern resembling that of developmentally arrested skeletal muscle. Differentiation therapy is an attractive approach to embryonal tumors of childhood including RMS; however, agents to drive RMS differentiation have not entered the clinic and their mechanisms remain unclear. MicroRNA-206 (miR-206) expression increases through normal muscle development and has decreased levels in RMS compared with normal skeletal muscle. Increasing miR-206 expression drives differentiation of RMS, but the target genes responsible for the relief of the development arrest are largely unknown. Using a combinatorial approach with gene and proteomic profiling coupled with genetic rescue, we identified key miR-206 targets responsible for the FN-RMS differentiation blockade, PAX7, PAX3, NOTCH3, and CCND2. Specifically, we determined that PAX7 downregulation is necessary for miR-206-induced cell cycle exit and myogenic differentiation in FN-RMS but not in FP-RMS. Gene knockdown of targets necessary for miR-206-induced differentiation alone or in combination was not sufficient to phenocopy the differentiation phenotype from miR-206, thus illustrating that miR-206 replacement offers the ability to modulate a complex network of genes responsible for the developmental arrest in FN-RMS. Genetic deletion of miR-206 in a mouse model of FN-RMS accelerated and exacerbated tumor development, indicating that both in vitro and in vivo miR-206 acts as a tumor suppressor in FN-RMS at least partially through downregulation of PAX7. Collectively, our results illustrate that miR-206 relieves the differentiation arrest in FN-RMS and suggests that miR-206 replacement could be a potential therapeutic differentiation strategy.

PMID:
27277678
PMCID:
PMC5143388
DOI:
10.1038/cddis.2016.159
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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