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Nat Commun. 2016 Jun 9;7:11656. doi: 10.1038/ncomms11656.

Golgi-localized STELLO proteins regulate the assembly and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.
2
Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QW, UK.
3
Energy Biosciences Institute, and Plant and Microbial Biology Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
4
School of Biosciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.
5
Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK.
6
Laboratório Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), Caixa Postal 6192, Campinas, São Paulo CEP 13083-970, Brazil.
7
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, School of Biosciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.

Abstract

As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, cellulose is a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is produced at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes (CSCs), which are assembled in the endomembrane system and trafficked to the plasma membrane. While several proteins that affect CesA activity have been identified, components that regulate CSC assembly and trafficking remain unknown. Here we show that STELLO1 and 2 are Golgi-localized proteins that can interact with CesAs and control cellulose quantity. In the absence of STELLO function, the spatial distribution within the Golgi, secretion and activity of the CSCs are impaired indicating a central role of the STELLO proteins in CSC assembly. Point mutations in the predicted catalytic domains of the STELLO proteins indicate that they are glycosyltransferases facing the Golgi lumen. Hence, we have uncovered proteins that regulate CSC assembly in the plant Golgi apparatus.

PMID:
27277162
PMCID:
PMC4906169
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms11656
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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