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Nat Neurosci. 2016 Jul;19(7):879-87. doi: 10.1038/nn.4316. Epub 2016 Jun 6.

YAP and TAZ control peripheral myelination and the expression of laminin receptors in Schwann cells.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biochemistry, Hunter James Kelly Research Institute, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
  • 2Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
  • 3Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
  • 5Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
  • 6Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Abstract

Myelination is essential for nervous system function. Schwann cells interact with neurons and the basal lamina to myelinate axons using known receptors, signals and transcription factors. In contrast, the transcriptional control of axonal sorting and the role of mechanotransduction in myelination are largely unknown. Yap and Taz are effectors of the Hippo pathway that integrate chemical and mechanical signals in cells. We describe a previously unknown role for the Hippo pathway in myelination. Using conditional mutagenesis in mice, we show that Taz is required in Schwann cells for radial sorting and myelination and that Yap is redundant with Taz. Yap and Taz are activated in Schwann cells by mechanical stimuli and regulate Schwann cell proliferation and transcription of basal lamina receptor genes, both necessary for radial sorting of axons and subsequent myelination. These data link transcriptional effectors of the Hippo pathway and of mechanotransduction to myelin formation in Schwann cells.

PMID:
27273766
PMCID:
PMC4925303
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4316
[PubMed - in process]
Free PMC Article
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