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Sci Rep. 2016 Jun 7;6:27475. doi: 10.1038/srep27475.

Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei toxin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis using a Caenorhabditis elegans ugt-29 biosensor.

Author information

1
School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi Selangor, Malaysia.
2
Malaysia Genome Institute, Jalan Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia.

Abstract

Toxins are believed to play a crucial role in Burkholderia pseudomallei pathogenicity, however to date, only a few have been identified. The discovery of additional toxic molecules is limited by the lack of a sensitive indicator of B. pseudomallei toxicity. Previously, from a whole genome transcriptome analysis of B. pseudomallei-infected Caenorhabditis elegans, we noted significant overexpression of a number of worm genes encoding detoxification enzymes, indicating the host's attempt to clear bacterial toxic molecules. One of these genes, ugt-29, a family member of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, was the most robustly induced phase II detoxification gene. In this study, we show that strong induction of ugt-29 is restricted to infections by the most virulent species among the pathogens tested. We also noted that ugt-29 is activated upon disruption of host protein synthesis. Hence, we propose that UGT-29 could be a promising biosensor to detect B. pseudomallei toxins that compromise host protein synthesis. The identification of bactobolin, a polyketide-peptide hybrid molecule, as a toxic molecule of B. pseudomallei further verifies the utilization of this surveillance system to search for bacterial toxins. Hence, a ugt-29 based reporter should be useful in screening for other molecules that inhibit host protein synthesis.

PMID:
27273550
PMCID:
PMC4895344
DOI:
10.1038/srep27475
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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