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PLoS One. 2016 Jun 7;11(6):e0157109. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0157109. eCollection 2016.

Category-Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex Follows Cortical Topology: A Grouped icEEG Study.

Author information

1
Vivian Smith Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, United States of America.
2
Memorial Hermann Hospital, Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, United States of America.

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies suggest that category-selective regions in higher-order visual cortex are topologically organized around specific anatomical landmarks: the mid-fusiform sulcus (MFS) in the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) and lateral occipital sulcus (LOS) in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC). To derive precise structure-function maps from direct neural signals, we collected intracranial EEG (icEEG) recordings in a large human cohort (n = 26) undergoing implantation of subdural electrodes. A surface-based approach to grouped icEEG analysis was used to overcome challenges from sparse electrode coverage within subjects and variable cortical anatomy across subjects. The topology of category-selectivity in bilateral VTC and LOC was assessed for five classes of visual stimuli-faces, animate non-face (animals/body-parts), places, tools, and words-using correlational and linear mixed effects analyses. In the LOC, selectivity for living (faces and animate non-face) and non-living (places and tools) classes was arranged in a ventral-to-dorsal axis along the LOS. In the VTC, selectivity for living and non-living stimuli was arranged in a latero-medial axis along the MFS. Written word-selectivity was reliably localized to the intersection of the left MFS and the occipito-temporal sulcus. These findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence for topological information structuring of functional representations within higher-order visual cortex.

PMID:
27272936
PMCID:
PMC4896492
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0157109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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