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J Appl Microbiol. 2016 Sep;121(3):657-71. doi: 10.1111/jam.13198. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

Effect of temperature (5-25°C) on epiphytic lactic acid bacteria populations and fermentation of whole-plant corn silage.

Author information

1
Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda, QC, Canada.
2
Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Milwaukee, WI, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature (5-25°C) on epiphytic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations during 60 days of fermentation of whole-plant corn silage.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Vacuum bag mini-silos of chopped whole-plant corn were incubated at five different temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25°C), according to a completely randomized design with four repetitions. The silos were opened and sampled on day 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 28 and 60. At 20 and 25°C, Lactobacillus plantarum- and Pediococcus  pentosaceus-related operational taxonomic units (OTU) dominated the fermentation within 1 day. After 7 days, the OTU related to the heterofermentative species Lactobacillus buchneri began to appear and it eventually dominated silages incubated at these temperatures. Population dynamic of LAB at 5 and 10°C was different. At these temperatures, Leuconostoc citreum OTU was identified at the beginning of the fermentation. Thereafter, Lactobacillus sakei- and Lactobacillus curvatus-related OTU appeared and quickly prevailed. Corn silage at 15°C acted as a transition between 20-25°C and 5-10°C, in terms of LAB diversity and succession.

CONCLUSION:

The conditions of silage incubation temperature affect species diversity of LAB population with notable difference along the temperature gradient. Colder temperature conditions (5 and 10°C) have led to the identification of LAB species never observed in corn silage.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY:

This study demonstrated the impact of temperature gradient on the diversity and some important population shift of lactic acid bacteria communities during fermentation of corn silage.

KEYWORDS:

cold climate; denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis; inoculant; lactic acid bacteria; microbial succession; temperature gradient

PMID:
27271320
DOI:
10.1111/jam.13198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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