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Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2016 Dec;401(8):1211-1217. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Kidney transplantation from deceased donors with elevated serum creatinine.

Author information

1
Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstraße 55, 45122, Essen, Germany.
2
Department of Surgery, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USA.
3
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
4
Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstraße 55, 45122, Essen, Germany. georgios.sotiropoulos@uni-due.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elevated donor serum creatinine has been associated with inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation (KT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of elevated donor serum creatinine on short and long-term outcomes and to determine possible ways to optimize the use of these organs.

METHODS:

All kidney transplants from 01-2000 to 12-2012 with donor creatinine ≥ 2 mg/dl were considered. Risk factors for delayed graft function (DGF) were explored with uni- and multivariate regression analyses. Donor and recipient data were analyzed with uni- and multivariate cox proportional hazard analyses. Graft and patient survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method.

RESULTS:

Seventy-eight patients were considered. Median recipient age and waiting time on dialysis were 53 years and 5.1 years, respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.2 years, 63 patients are alive. 1, 3, and 5-year graft and patient survival rates were 92, 89, and 89 % and 96, 93, and 89 %, respectively. Serum creatinine level at procurement and recipient's dialysis time prior to KT were predictors of DGF in multivariate analysis (p = 0.0164 and p = 0.0101, respectively). Charlson comorbidity score retained statistical significance by multivariate regression analysis for graft survival (p = 0.0321). Recipient age (p = 0.0035) was predictive of patient survival by multivariate analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Satisfactory long-term kidney transplant outcomes in the setting of elevated donor serum creatinine ≥2 mg/dl can be achieved when donor creatinine is <3.5 mg/dl, and the recipient has low comorbidities, is under 56 years of age, and remains in dialysis prior to KT for <6.8 years.

KEYWORDS:

Acute kidney injury; Delayed graft function; Expanded criteria donor; Kidney allocation; Kidney transplantation; Marginal donor

PMID:
27270909
DOI:
10.1007/s00423-016-1445-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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