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Nat Immunol. 2016 Aug;17(8):966-75. doi: 10.1038/ni.3483. Epub 2016 Jun 6.

Human memory T cells with a naive phenotype accumulate with aging and respond to persistent viruses.

Author information

1
Department of Immunobiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA.
2
Arizona Center on Aging, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA.
3
Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, California, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
5
Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
6
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
7
Department of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA.
8
Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
9
Department of Biochemistry &Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
10
Sulzburger Columbia Genome Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
11
Statistics Consulting Laboratory, Bio5, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA.
12
Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
13
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
14
National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
15
Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA.

Abstract

The number of naive T cells decreases and susceptibility to new microbial infections increases with age. Here we describe a previously unknown subset of phenotypically naive human CD8(+) T cells that rapidly secreted multiple cytokines in response to persistent viral antigens but differed transcriptionally from memory and effector T cells. The frequency of these CD8(+) T cells, called 'memory T cells with a naive phenotype' (TMNP cells), increased with age and after severe acute infection and inversely correlated with the residual capacity of the immune system to respond to new infections with age. CD8(+) TMNP cells represent a potential new target for the immunotherapy of persistent infections and should be accounted for and subtracted from the naive pool if truly naive T cells are needed to respond to antigens.

PMID:
27270402
PMCID:
PMC4955715
DOI:
10.1038/ni.3483
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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